Issue 38 – April/May/June 2021

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Hello again,

As I write this, the UK government is cheerleading about “Freedom Day” and a return to normality, despite the inevitable rise in COVID cases this will bring about and the even more concerning figures emerging about underlying health conditions and problems associated with lifestyle diseases.
We’re looking at a drop in lifespans of 1.6 years for men and 1.2 years for women across North West England, for example.

The impact on poorer areas is much greater than affluent towns and villages. Sticking with figures from Greater Manchester, in Salford, the male COVID mortality rate was 400 per 100,000 people.

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Feature

Hello again,

As I write this, the UK government is cheerleading about “Freedom Day” and a return to normality, despite the inevitable rise in COVID cases this will bring about and the even more concerning figures emerging about underlying health conditions and problems associated with lifestyle diseases.
We’re looking at a drop in lifespans of 1.6 years for men and 1.2 years for women across North West England, for example.

The impact on poorer areas is much greater than affluent towns and villages. Sticking with figures from Greater Manchester, in Salford, the male COVID mortality rate was 400 per 100,000 people. In Trafford, which is an affluent area, it was 250 per 100,000. That means 150 more men died in every 100,000 because they came from a poor background and were thus more likely to have underlying health problems often predicated on poor nutrition and unhealthy habits. Health inequalities are going to be increasingly important over the next decade as the government commits to “levelling up” and we seek to become a healthier nation. There’s something fundamentally wrong with our approach to health and wellbeing when your postcode means that, on average a woman born in Blackpool will drop dead 7.7 years before one born in Westminster.

That’s why this issue contains a special report on health inequalities, because holistic therapy should, in an ideal world, be available to everyone.
Another theme that runs through this issue is the differing attitudes that we and our clients have towards this return to normality. Many people are reluctant to resume their previous way of life and will be wary of coming back to the practice room. Some don’t want lockdown to end. Indeed, some holistic therapists may not be sure about resuming treatments even though the restrictions are lifted. There are also many potential clients who’ve re-evaluated their lives and now want to prioritise their personal health and wellbeing, so we’re exploring the best ways of working out what will work best for you and your business.

Whether you’re raring to go, want to move online, just starting out or you’re apprehensively dipping your toe in the water after lockdown, we’re here for you.

Love,

Alison and everyone at Holistic Therapist

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